School Programs

Interpretive Tours

Places To Live/Places To Work

Places To Live/Places To Work

This tour begins with a discussion about places where people live and work. Students are asked to describe the characteristics that make a place a home or business site. A thinking game is played at each stop to enable students to learn about life and work while walking among the museum’s many buildings and sites.

Community Life - Then And Now

Community Life - Then And Now

This tour focuses on family and community life during the late 1800s. At the Tenant House and the Log Cabin, discussion centers on work in the home, including the importance of chores done by children. The Schoolhouse, a place of learning, is shown to be a center for community activities. The Blacksmith’s Shop and Carriage Shed are used as focal points for discussion about transportation. Visits to the Red Mill and the quarry buildings afford opportunities to talk about modes of communication, community status, educational values and gender roles. Children’s roles in the community are expressed throughout the tour.

Rural Industrial Life

Rural Industrial Life

This tour revolves around the processes of work, machines and natural energy. It starts with a detailed tour of the Mill and includes the harnessing of water power and human power. The tour also includes an explanation of the Mill’s products: wool, feed grains, linseed oil, basket making, graphite and talc. It continues with a visit to the Mulligan Quarry. The relative comfort of the quarry office is contrasted with the reality of the dangerous work on the face of the cliff and the long shift work sweating by the heat from the lime kilns.

Living in History

A One-Room School Experience

A One-Room School Experience

Students take part in 19th century lessons in the circa 1860 one-room schoolhouse using McGuffey Readers, slates and slate pencils, pen and ink bottles, as well as other learning tools and materials of the 19th century. A School Marm/Master challenges students to solve problems in mental mathematics, participate in a spelling bee, improve their handwriting skills and learn about a child’s daily life at the turn of the century.

Log Cabin Skills

Log Cabin Skills

Students are invited to try their hands at 18th century chores such as corn shelling, wool-carding, candle making and other chores associated with log cabin living. This workshop includes an exploration of the Morgan Cabin, Spring House and Herb Garden.

 

Curriculum: Explorations Outside the Classroom

Colonial America

Colonial America

Students will examine the social, economic and political issues of 18th century America and New Jersey. This program includes viewing specific artifacts and interactive tours of the Red Mill, Blacksmith Shop, Log Cabin, Spring House and Herb Garden. Includes the following hands-on activities: log cabin (carding, spinning and weaving), candle making, and 18th century militia drill.

 
Archaeology

Archaeology

Students will dig in and experience what it is like to be an archaeologist by excavating, recording and identifying their finds. By studying these artifacts, students will learn how archaeologists use observation skills and specialized knowledge to discover how people lived and worked during the 18th and 19th centuries. For groups of 60 or fewer students only.

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This